Picture of the evelina resolution project team

The Evelina Resolution Project was originally a two year project funded by the Guys and St Thomas’s charity to support health professionals and families where there is conflict. Launched in January 2013 the project is based at the Evelina Children’s Hospital in London. It has been funded by the hospital since 2015.

The project has provided the Evelina London with a unique opportunity to implement and evaluate the mediation and decision-support service created by The Medical Mediation Foundation in 2010/11 with initial funding from the Department of Health’s £30 million Children’s Palliative care Fund. Watch our film and read more about the mediation service provided for families and health professionals:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dMOjj5pxtOI
http://evelinalondon.nhs.uk/parents-and-visitors/when-you-need-help/mediation.aspx

Listen to the BBC Radio Four “Today” programme on our work at the Evelina London and in Southampton

What’s the aim of the project?

The Evelina Resolution Project aims to

  • create a culture in which conflict between parents and health professionals is recognised, managed and resolved quickly.
  • provide a safety net for patients, families and staff to help make sure the focus of attention remains the interests of the child NOT the conflict.

The Evelina Resolution project is providing:

  • an innovative mediation and decision-support service for the hospital to achieve early identification and resolution of disputes between clinicians, health professionals and families, in order to reduce the impact on all those concerned.
  • training for staff at the Evelina to improve early recognition and management of conflicts. Almost 1,400 staff of all disciplines have been trained since June 2013
  • a conflict management framework for the hospital which takes specific account of the nature and escalation of disputes between clinicians, health professionals and families.

Why is The Evelina Resolution project needed?

Advances in medical care and treatment mean that many children with increasingly complex conditions are living for longer. Parents and health professionals regularly face decisions over medical treatment that are increasingly challenging and where there is much greater scope for serious disagreement.

When decisions become contentious, the impact on all concerned is considerable.

 

Evelina team members

Sarah Barclay
Director

Dr. Esse Menson
Clinical Director

Dr. Liz Forbat
Evaluation Lead

Jean Simons
Trainer